Gov. Burgum Directs Flags to Fly at Half-Staff
Posted by KSJB News on 11/6/2017 8:59:00 AM.

 

BISMARCK, N.D. (Mike Nowatzki) – Gov. Doug Burgum today issued the following statement in response to Sunday’s shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, in which at least 26 people were killed and 20 injured.
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First TechStars Startup Weekend Coming to Jamestown Regional Entrepreneur Center
Posted by KSJB News on 11/6/2017 6:18:00 AM.

 Katherine Roth, JREC

 
JAMESTOWN (submitted) - Do you have an idea you’d like to pursue or a problem you’d like to solve but don’t know where to start or who to start with? On Friday, December 1, 2017, the Jamestown Regional Entrepreneur Center in collaboration with the University of Jamestown will be hosting the first Jamestown Techstars Startup Weekend Dec. 1 – 3.
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Kidde Recalling 40 Million Fire Extinguishers From 1973 to This Year
Posted by KSJB News on 11/2/2017 8:30:00 AM.
 
DETROIT (AP) - More than 40 million fire extinguishers in the U.S. and Canada are being recalled because they might not work in an emergency.
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Five Tips for Eating Smart During the Holidays
Posted by KSJB News on 11/1/2017 7:25:00 AM.

 

Fargo, N.D., (Chrissy Meyer) — Seasonal sweet treats and multi-course meals tempt even the most dedicated healthy eaters during the holidays. That’s why the American Heart Association is designating November as Eat Smart Month.
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Farm Rescue Gearing Up for Annual Banquet
Posted by KSJB News on 11/1/2017 6:42:00 AM.

 

HORACE, N.D., (submitted) - Farm Rescue, a nonprofit organization that provides planting, haying, hay hauling and harvesting assistance free of charge to farm and ranch families who have experienced a major illness, injury or natural disaster, is wrapping up preparations for its annual banquet.
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  • Supporting Farmers During Stressful Times
    In a tough economy, farmers are experiencing more stress than previous years. Minnesota Department of Agriculture Director of Mental Health Outreach Ted Matthews says the stressors placed upon agriculture right now are a serious problem. In particular, Matthews is worried about the future. "Farmers are losing money, and it's incredibly difficult for them to just break even," says Matthews. "It's systematic. The depression gets deeper and stronger as time goes on. No one knows what the future will bring. Many industries in agriculture are making money, but they're making money off farmers who are losing money." As a resource, MDA will be hosting a series of ‘Supporting Farmers in Stressful Times’ workshops starting in January. Matthews says unfortunately, there aren’t many resources for those supporting farmers. "People who work with farmers tend to be helpers, and they have stress of their own. Because of this, helpers need to learn techniques to take care of themselves as well. If we can't take care of ourselves, we're not going to be very good at taking care of other people." Hear more from Matthews here.
  • MN Soybean Growers Submit Dicamba Reccomendations
    The Minnesota Soybean Growers Association Drift Task Force has written a letter to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture recommending the Department adapt a new EPA label for dicamba in Minnesota, determine a cutoff date for application with collaboration from the industry and initiate education opportunities for proper use and stewardship of the technology.
  • We Don't Want a Repeat
    Chairman of the task force, Bob Worth, told RRFN dicamba works, but soybean farmers don’t want to have the issues the product caused this year. Worth says farmers want the product. “A lot of people had no issues with dicamba this past year. There is a fair amount of people who had the issue of the chemical moving, even if they followed the label to a ‘T.’ Everything on the label they did correctly. As a group, we really spent a lot of time looking at all options. How we could make this to never happen again.” Worth also says there needs to be more input on the cutoff date, but Worth isn’t concerned about a phase out of dicamba from Minnesota. Worth says it was recommended the soybean growers send their letter to the Department of Agriculture before Thanksgiving. “The EPA did some very good stuff. They made it a restricted use pesticide and made sure they got a lot of good things from their new ruling. We’re 100 percent behind the EPA on the ruling. This is one time they did a really good job on their homework. Is Minnesota going to go above and beyond the EPA? We don’t know.”
  • Controlling Vapor Drift
    In Minnesota Soybean’s recommendations on dicamba, the group also asks the Minnesota Ag Department to include a temperature cutoff. This includes no application if predicted or actual temperature high is at 85-degrees Fahrenheit or above. Minnesota Soybean’s Director of Research Dr. David Kee says the temperature was chosen based on previous drift research, noting drift accelerated after that temperature. “If you look at the time of year we’re looking at for dicamba applications, May and June, there will be times where drift will impact our growers. Vapor drift impacts other growers. We have to control this material.” Kee says soybeans are very sensitive. Vapor drift needs to be controlled moving forward. He doesn’t think the situation will be similar to Arkansas, in which the product would eventually be completely banned. 
  • Minnesota's Decision Released in December
    Minnesota agriculture commissioner Frederickson did release a statement to RRFN regarding the letter. Frederickson said he appreciates the efforts of the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association and their Drift Task Force. “The recommendations they provided to the Department, along with information gathered through our survey and investigations, will help guide my decision on registration of this product. I will announce that decision in December.”  
  • How to Better Understand Inversions
    The agriculture industry is working to better understand volatility and temperature inversions. North Dakota State University Extension pesticide program specialist Andrew Thostenson says inversions don’t create problems. It’s what happens when an inversion is in place when pesticides are sprayed or if there are volatile pesticides in the area when an inversion is underway. Thostenson says there’s a reasonably good appreciation for this information, but some applicators may not fully understand. The process is complicated. “It’s not something that can be easily broken down into several paragraphs or even into a few pages. You really need to see the whole context of what’s going on.” As an agriculture industry, can we solve these problems? Thostenson says that’s not certain right now. “I’m not going to condemn this technology other than to say we have observed a situation where things happen even the direst of predictors couldn’t have predicted. In North Dakota, we will be in a situation where half of the acres will be tolerance and half will not. We will add more dicamba into the environment, because we’re treating more acres. My hope is we’ll get it right.”
  • Lessons Learned
    With the new dicamba technology, RRFN hosted a special radio series late this summer. Lessons Learned is produced by the Red River Farm Network to provide education and the tools to help growers prepare for 2018. You can go back and review this series. Listen to the podcast. Thanks to BASF and Peterson Farms Seed for sponsoring this initiative. 
Provided by Red River Farm Network

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